2629 courthouse circle flowood ms 39232

Das Plastic Surgery Center

Plastic surgery is a broad field, and may be subdivided further. Plastic surgery training and approval by the American Board of Plastic Surgery includes mastery of the following as well:

Craniofacial

Craniofacial surgery is divided into pediatric and adult craniofacial surgery. Pediatric craniofacial surgery mostly revolves around the treatment of congenital anomalies of the craniofacial skeleton and soft tissues, such as cleft lip and palate, craniosynostosis, and pediatric fractures. Because these children have multiple issues, the best approach to providing care to them is an interdisciplinary approach which also includes otolaryngologists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, speech therapists, occupational therapists and geneticists. Adult craniofacial surgery deals mostly with fractures and secondary surgeries (such as orbital reconstruction) along with orthognathic surgery. Craniofacial surgery is an integral part of all plastic surgery training programs, and further training is frequently obtained via a craniofacial fellowship for additional expertise.

Hand

Hand surgery is concerned with acute injuries and chronic diseases of the hand and wrist, correction of congenital malformations of the upper extremities, and peripheral nerve problems (such as brachial plexus injuries or carpal tunnel syndrome). Hand surgery is an important part of training in plastic surgery, as well as microsurgery, which is necessary to replant an amputated extremity. Most Hand surgeons will opt to complete a fellowship in Hand Surgery. The Hand surgery field is also practiced by orthopedic surgeons and general surgeons (see Hand surgeon).

Micro

Microsurgery is generally concerned with the reconstruction of missing tissues by transferring a piece of tissue to the reconstruction site and reconnecting blood vessels. Popular subspecialty areas are breast reconstruction, head and neck reconstruction, hand surgery/replantation, and brachial plexus surgery.

Burn

Burn surgery generally takes place in two phases. Acute burn surgery is the treatment immediately after a burn. Reconstructive burn surgery takes place after the burn wounds have healed. Reconstructive surgery generally involves plastic surgery.

Pediatric

Children often face medical issues unique from the experiences of an adult patient. Many birth defects or syndromes present at birth are best treated in childhood, and pediatric plastic surgeons specialize in treating these conditions in children. Conditions commonly treated by pediatric plastic surgeons include craniofacial anomalies, cleft lip and palate and congenital hand deformities.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mississippi Plastic Surgeon

2629 Courthouse Circle Flowood MS 39232 Office Hours: Monday through Friday 8:00am – 5:00pm Phone: 601-362-0611 Fax: 601-362-0192

Das Plastic Surgery proudly serves clients in the USA.  We are centrally located in the greater Jackson Mississippi area.

Das Plastic Surgery Center
2629 Courthouse Circle
Flowood, Mississippi  39232

Call now: 601-362-0611

Mississippi Aesthetic Surgery

Aesthetic surgery involves techniques intended for the “enhancement” of appearance through surgical and medical techniques, and is specifically concerned with maintaining normal appearance, restoring it, or enhancing it beyond the average level toward some aesthetic ideal.

In 2006, nearly 11 million cosmetic surgeries were performed in the United States alone. The number of cosmetic procedures performed in the United States has increased over 50 percent since the start of the century. Nearly 12 million cosmetic surgeries were performed in 2007, with the five most common being breast augmentation, liposuction, nasal surgery, eyelid surgery and abdominoplasty. The increased use of cosmetic surgery crosses racial and ethnic lines in the U.S., with increases seen among African-Americans and Hispanic Americans as well as Caucasian Americans. In Europe, the second largest market for cosmetic procedures, cosmetic surgery is a $2.2 billion business.[7]

The most prevalent aesthetic/cosmetic procedures include:

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jackson MS Plastic Surgery – History

Walter Yeo, a British soldier, is often cited as the first known person to have benefited from plastic surgery. The photograph shows him during the procedure (left) and after (right) receiving a skin graft performed by Sir Harold Gillies in 1917.

Reconstructive surgery techniques were being carried out in India by 2000 BC.[1] Sushruta, considered the father of surgery, made important contributions to the field of plastic and cataract surgery in 6th century BC.[2] The medical works of both Sushruta and Charak were translated into Arabic language during the Abbasid Caliphate in 750 AD.[3] These Arabic works made their way into Europe via intermediaries.[3] In Italy the Branca family of Sicily and Gaspare Tagliacozzi (Bologna) became familiar with the techniques of Sushruta.[3]

British physicians traveled to India to see rhinoplasties being performed by native methods.[4] Reports on Indian rhinoplasty were published in the Gentleman’s Magazine by 1794.[4] Joseph Constantine Carpue spent 20 years in India studying local plastic surgery methods.[4] Carpue was able to perform the first major surgery in the Western world by 1815.[5] Instruments described in the Sushruta Samhita were further modified in the Western world.[5]

The ancient Egyptians and Romans also performed plastic cosmetic surgery. The Romans were able to perform simple techniques, such as repairing damaged ears from around the 1st century BC. For religious reasons, they did not dissect either human beings or animals, thus their knowledge was based in its entirety on the texts of their Greek predecessors. Notwithstanding, Aulus Cornelius Celsus left some surprisingly accurate anatomical descriptions, some of which — for instance, his studies on the genitalia and the skeleton — are of special interest to plastic surgery.[6]

In 1465, Sabuncuoglu’s book, description, and classification of hypospadias was more informative and up to date. Localization of urethral meatus was described in detail. Sabuncuoglu also detailed the description and classification of ambiguous genitalia.[citation needed] In mid-15th century Europe, Heinrich von Pfolspeundt described a process “to make a new nose for one who lacks it entirely, and the dogs have devoured it” by removing skin from the back of the arm and suturing it in place. However, because of the dangers associated with surgery in any form, especially that involving the head or face, it was not until the 19th and 20th centuries that such surgery became commonplace.

Up until the techniques of anesthesia became established, all surgery on healthy tissues involved great pain. Infection from surgery was reduced by the introduction of sterile techniques and disinfectants. The invention and use of antibiotics, beginning with sulfa drugs and penicillin, was another step in making elective surgery possible.

In 1792, Chopart performed operative procedure on a lip using a flap from the neck. In 1814, Joseph Carpue successfully performed operative procedure on a British military officer who had lost his nose to the toxic effects of mercury treatments. In 1818, German surgeon Carl Ferdinand von Graefe published his major work entitled Rhinoplastik. Von Graefe modified the Italian method using a free skin graft from the arm instead of the original delayed pedicle flap. In 1845, Johann Friedrich Dieffenbach wrote a comprehensive text on rhinoplasty, entitled Operative Chirurgie, and introduced the concept of reoperation to improve the cosmetic appearance of the reconstructed nose. In 1891, American otorhinolaryngologist John Roe presented an example of his work, a young woman on whom he reduced a dorsal nasal hump for cosmetic indications. In 1892, Robert Weir experimented unsuccessfully with xenografts (duck sternum) in the reconstruction of sunken noses. In 1896, James Israel, a urological surgeon from Germany, and in 1889 George Monks of the United States each described the successful use of heterogeneous free-bone grafting to reconstruct saddle nose defects. In 1898, Jacques Joseph, the German orthopaedic-trained surgeon, published his first account of reduction rhinoplasty. In 1928, Jacques Joseph published Nasenplastik und Sonstige Gesichtsplastik.

The first American plastic surgeon was John Peter Mettauer, who, in 1827, performed the first cleft palate operation with instruments that he designed himself.

In World War I, a New Zealand otolaryngologist working in London, Harold Gillies, developed many of the techniques of modern plastic surgery in caring for soldiers suffering from disfiguring facial injuries. His work was expanded upon during World War II by his cousin and former student Archibald McIndoe, who pioneered treatments for RAF aircrew suffering from severe burns. McIndoe’s radical, experimental treatments, led to the formation of the Guinea Pig Club. In 1951, Gillies carried out the first male-to-female sex change operation.

Plastic surgery, as a specialty, evolved remarkably during the 20th century in the United States. One of the founders of the specialty, Vilray Blair, was the first chief of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. In one of his many areas of clinical expertise, Blair treated World War I soldiers with complex maxillofacial injuries, and his paper on “Reconstructive Surgery of the Face” set the standard for craniofacial reconstruction. He was also one of the first surgeons without a dental background to be elected to the American Association of Oral and Plastic Surgery (later the organizations split to be renamed the American Association of Plastic Surgeons and the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons), and he taught many surgeons who became leaders in the field of plastic surgery.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Botox

BOTOX® Injections

The cosmetic form of botulinum toxin, often referred to by its product name BOTOX®, is a popular non-surgical injection that temporarily reduces or eliminates frown lines, forehead creases, crows feet near the eyes and thick bands in the neck. The toxin blocks the nerve impulses, temporarily paralyzing the muscles that cause wrinkles while giving the skin a smoother, more refreshed appearance.  Studies have also suggested that BOTOX is effective in relieving migraine headaches, excessive sweating and muscle spasms in the neck and eyes.

Laser Resurfacing

Laser stands for Light Amplification by the Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Lasers work by producing an intense beam of bright light that travels in one direction. The laser beam can gently vaporize and/or ablate skin tissue to improve wrinkles, scars and blemishes, seal blood vessels or cut skin tissue.
The laser has the unique ability to produce one specific color (wavelength) of light, which can be varied in its intensity and pulse duration. The newest laser systems have become remarkably precise and selective, allowing treatment results and safety levels not previously available.

WHAT IS SKIN RESURFACING?
Laser resurfacing to improve cosmetic flaws, such as wrinkles, acne scars, and aging and sun-damaged skin, is the latest scientific breakthrough in skin rejuvenation.

Using a wand-like laser handpiece, undesired skin cells and wrinkles literally disappear in a puff of mist and are replaced by fresh skin cells. One of the laser’s most significant advantages over traditional techniques for skin resurfacing is that treatment is relatively bloodless. The procedure also offers more control in the depth of penetration of the skin’s surface, allowing an increased degree of precision and safety in treating delicate areas.

WHO IS QUALIFIED TO PERFORM LASER SURGERY?
Dermatologic surgeons have extensive experience with laser surgery and were among the first specialists to use lasers for skin renewal and treating a variety of skin disorders. Since results are technique-sensitive and entail an artistic component, it’s important to select a dermasurgeon with demonstrated laser expertise

WHAT CONDITIONS CAN LASER RESURFACING TREAT?
Laser resurfacing is performed in the dermasurgeon’s office to help:

  • Erase fine lines and wrinkles of the face
  • Smooth and tighten eyelid skin
  • Improve crow’s feet around the eyes
  • Soften pucker marks and frown lines
  • Remove brown spots and splotchy, uneven skin color
  • Improve and flatten scars
  • Repair smoker’s lines
  • Improve skin tone and texture

HOW DOES THE CARBON DIOXIDE (CO2) LASER WORK?
The newest generation of the CO2 laser delivers short bursts of extremely high-energy laser light. This revolutionary technology actually vaporizes the undesired skin tissue, one layer at a time, revealing fresh skin underneath. The laser’s highly-focused aim enables the dermasurgeon to gently remove the skin’s surface with a low risk of scarring and complications in properly selected patients.

HOW DOES THE ERBIUM (Er) LASER WORK?
The high-powered erbium:YAG laser produces energy in a wavelength that gently penetrates the skin, is readily absorbed by water (a major component of tissue cells), and scatters the heat effects of the laser light. These unique properties allow dermasurgeons to remove thin layers of skin tissue with exquisite precision while minimizing damage to surrounding skin.

The Er:YAG laser is commonly used for skin resurfacing in patients who have superficial to moderate facial wrinkles, mild surface scars or splotchy skin discolorations. Skin rejuvenation with the Er:YAG laser offers the advantages of reduced redness, decreased side effects and rapid healing compared to some other laser systems.

HOW DO NON-ABLATIVE LASERS WORK?
Unlike laser resurfacing technologies that heat and remove the top skin tissue, non-ablative or non-wounding lasers actually work beneath the surface skin layer. This novel approach appears to stimulate collagen growth and tighten underlying skin to improve skin tone and remove fine lines and mild to moderate skin damage. It offers the patient the benefits of few side effects and rapid healing with virtually no “downtime.”

WHAT CAN BE EXPECTED DURING AND AFTER TREATMENT?
Discomfort is usually minor during the procedure, and your dermasurgeon can discuss the administration of any pain medication prior to treatment.

Following skin resurfacing, the treated areas usually are kept moist with ointment or surgical bandages for the first few days. The skin is typically red or pink and may be covered with a fine crust. The treated sites must be protected from sunlight after the procedure. Once healing is completed, sunblock lotion should be applied. In some cases, a pink surface color may remain for several days to several months. Make-up can be worn after about 7-14 days.

ARE THERE SIDE EFFECTS OR COMPLICATIONS?
Each year thousands of laser resurfacing procedures are performed successfully. Significant complications are rare, and the risk of scarring is low. Some patients may be at risk for varying degrees of pigmentation loss, particularly with the CO2 laser. Common minor side effects may include crusting, mild swelling, redness or brown discoloration at the treatment sites. These are usually minimized by surgical techniques and pre- and post-operative regimens.

WHAT ARE THE LIMITATIONS OF LASER RESURFACING?
Laser resurfacing is not a substitute for a facelift, nor can the procedure eliminate excessive skin or jowls. However, by tightening loose skin, laser resurfacing can improve certain folds and creases. Laser resurfacing offers an alternative to traditional resurfacing methods like dermabrasion, and can also work well in conjunction with or as an additional treatment to other cosmetic skin procedures such as chemical peelsblepharoplasty (eyelid surgery) and liposuction of the face and neck.

Breast Surgery

Also known as augmentation mammaplasty, breast augmentation surgery involves using breast implants to fulfill your desire for fuller breasts (breast enlargement) or to restore breast volume lost after weight reduction or pregnancy (breast enhancement).